Caregiver Training Videos

Caregiver Training Videos - YouTube

     People learn in many different ways, but viewing the performance of a task multiple times promotes recall of steps through repetition. Therefore, I searched YouTube for caregiver training videos that demonstrated professional caregivers correctly performing tasks that home caregivers might need to perform, as well.

     Some procedures have multiple ways of doing them. If you received training using a different method, continue to use what you know. I am not advocating that one method is better than another. My purpose for providing this information is

  • to make the information available to you as a resource if you need it
  • to give you an example of how to perform the procedure safely and correctly, and
  • to answer your questions about the procedures if you have any.

      In addition to procedural caregiver training videos, I am also providing informational videos related to how to interact with the person receiving care. Again, sometimes seeing how someone else interacts with someone angry gives you an idea about how to approach a similar situation. I hope you will find these examples useful.  If you find a broken link, please send me an email so that I know to reconnect it. Thank you in advance. 

Donna

Caregiving Videos on Managing Emotions Produced by Elaine Sanchez CaregiverHelp.com

Alzeheimer's aggression with angry outbursts
Managing Caregiver Anger
Published on Dec 10, 2012
 
http://www.caregiverhelp.com/ Caregiver Speaker Elaine K Sanchez, http://www.caregiverhelp.com/ and http://EKSanchez.com, talks about how to develop an action plan to manage caregiver anger and stress. Caregivers get angry. They get angry with the disease, with their care receivers, with the medical community, insurance companies, siblings, friends, and children. The number of people, situations and events over which they have little or no control is practically limitless. The question is not whether caregivers will get mad, the question is how they choose to deal with stress and anger. If you are caring for someone with a dementia-related disease, it helps to remember that the disease is in control, not the patient. Try to stay calm when they display challenging behaviors. Getting involved in a caregiver support group can provide a safe place to vent your anger because you’ll be with other people who are having similar experiences and will understand what you’re going through.
Caregiver Depression
Published on Dec 10, 2012
 
http://www.caregiverhelp.com/ Caregiver Speaker Elaine K Sanchez, http://www.caregiverhelp.com/ and http://EKSanchez.com, discusses how to recognize the symptoms of Reactionary Depression and overcome feelings of despondency and hopelessness. Caregivers get depressed as they witness the decline of someone they love and as their own lives become more complicated, restrictive and reclusive. There isn’t one single cause of depression among caregivers, or even just one type of depression. It isn’t unusual for someone who is caregiving to experience both reactionary depression and clinical depression. Reactionary depression can be caused by a specific event or set of circumstance. Caregivers also get depressed when they stuff feelings of anger and guilt rather than dealing with them. Signs of depression can include a negative attitude, difficulty sleeping, change in eating habits, inability to concentrate, difficulty making decisions along with a variety of body complaints, including headaches, backaches and various digestive disorders. The good news is that you can work your way through a bout of reactionary depression with conscious effort and a little time. This is one in a series of videos about caregiver depression on Elaine’s video-based Caregiver Help website.
Dealing with Caregiver Fatigue 
Published on Dec 10, 2012
 
http://www.caregiverhelp.com Caregiver Speaker Elaine K Sanchez, http://www.caregiverhelp.com/ and http://EKSanchez.com, discusses how fatigue contributes to caregiver anger and burnout Sleep deprivation and fatigue can have a devastating impact on a caregiver’s mental and physical health. When a people don’t get enough sleep, their ability to think and reason is seriously impacted. Extreme fatigue can lead to poor decision making, erratic behavior, depression, irregular heartbeat, high blood pressure, heart attacks and strokes. Without adequate rest, caregiver burnout is difficult to avoid. Everyone will experience a restless night once in a while, but if occasional sleeplessness becomes chronic insomnia, a doctor needs to be consulted to see if it’s a medical problem for which there is a medical solution. If caregivers aren’t sleeping at night because their care receivers can’t sleep, respite care may be the answer. It’s important to recognize that getting enough sleep may play a more critical role than even food and water in a caregiver’s ability to think and function. There is no substitute for sleep. The only cure for sleep deprivation is sleep. CaregiverHelp is a video-based support program developed by Elaine K Sanchez and Dr. Alex A Sanchez. Visit their website for more caregiver support.
Overcoming Caregiver Fear 
Published on Dec 10, 2012
 
http://www.caregiverhelp.com/ Caregiver Speaker Elaine K Sanchez, http://www.caregiverhelp.com/ and http://EKSanchez.com provides strategies for helping caregivers manage fear and anxiety. Family caregivers fear how bad it’s going to get, how long it’s going to last and how much it’s going to cost. Healthcare workers fear making a mistake that will cause further harm to their care receivers. They also fear getting hurt, other people’s anger and losing their jobs. All types of caregivers fear death, even when they know it is inevitable and they are eager for the suffering to end. Caring for aging parents, individuals who have Alzheimer’s, or Parkinson’s and other types of progressive and degenerative diseases, is incredibly difficult and there are a lot of unknowns. This video offers caregivers a strategy for facing fears and for developing a plan of action if the worst possible thing that could happen does happen.
How to Manage Caregiver Frustration
Published on Dec 10, 2012
http://www.caregiverhelp.com/ Caregiver Speaker Elaine K Sanchez, http://www.caregiverhelp.com/ and http://EKSanchez.com, shares strategies for helping caregivers manage stress and frustration. When caring for aging parents, individuals who have Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s or some other progressive and degenerative disease, it is inevitable that caregivers will experience frustration. Most caregivers get frustrated over not being able to control the disease. They get stressed out over the behavior of other people and the fact that there is cure for the diseases that are causing their loved ones to suffer. This video offers strategies for understanding and coping with the stress and frustration of caring for those who are aging, chronically ill or disabled. It is one in a series of videos about coping with caregiver anger on Elaine’s video-based Caregiver Help website.
Caregivers!!! Stop Feeling Guilty
Published on Dec 10, 2012
 
http://www.caregiverhelp.com/ Caregiver Speaker Elaine K Sanchez, http://www.caregiverhelp.com/ and http://EKSanchez.com, discusses how to recognize the symptoms of Reactionary Depression and overcome feelings of despondency and hopelessness. Caregivers get depressed as they witness the decline of someone they love and as their own lives become more complicated, restrictive and reclusive. There isn’t one single cause of depression among caregivers, or even just one type of depression. It isn’t unusual for someone who is caregiving to experience both reactionary depression and clinical depression. Reactionary depression can be caused by a specific event or set of circumstance. Caregivers also get depressed when they stuff feelings of anger and guilt rather than dealing with them. Signs of depression can include a negative attitude, difficulty sleeping, change in eating habits, inability to concentrate, difficulty making decisions along with a variety of body complaints, including headaches, backaches and various digestive disorders. The good news is that you can work your way through a bout of reactionary depression with conscious effort and a little time. This is one in a series of videos about caregiver depression on Elaine’s video-based Caregiver Help website.
Guilt – Get Lost You Big Bully
Published on Oct 4, 2012
 
http://www.caregiverhelp.com/ Caregiver Speaker Elaine K Sanchez, http://www.caregiverhelp.com/ and http://EKSanchez.com talks about how caregivers can stop feeling guilty and start feeling good about all they do to care for others. Caregivers sometimes feel guilty about things they did or didn’t do, but most of the time they struggle with guilt because of the way they feel. Being a caregiver is extremely stressful. Caregivers get angry, and then they feel guilty for saying things they wish they could take back. Caregivers feel guilty because they don’t like the way their feel toward their care receiver. They feel guilty because they’re not always as kind or patient as they’d like to be. They experience feelings of guilt because they resent the amount of time it takes to meet their care receiver’s needs. They struggle with their feelings because sometimes they think about how much something will cost before they think about how it will benefit their care receiver, and sometimes they are overwhelmed with feelings of guilt when they wish their care receiver would just die and get it over with. Guilt can be a cruel and controlling emotion that often contributes to caregiver burnout. This is one in a series of videos about overcoming feelings of caregiver guilt on Elaine’s video-based Caregiver Help website.
Caregiver Guilt – What a Trip

Published on Jun 3, 2013

 
http://www.caregiverhelp.com/ Caregiver Speaker Elaine K Sanchez,http://www.caregiverhelp.com/ and http://EKSanchez.com, provides strategies for understanding and managing dementia-related challenging behaviors. People who have Alzheimer’s and other dementia-related diseases often display challenging behaviors. It is important to remember that the disease is in charge and they are acting out because of the damage that has occurred in their brains or because they have an unmet need, such as hunger, thirst or pain that they cannot express. This is the fifth and final video in the Sex, Violence and Other Dementia Issues module on CaregiverHelp.com, a video-based support program that provides insights and strategies for managing the stress of caring for individuals who are stroke survivors, have Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other progressive and degenerative diseases.